Author Topic: Sequencing Processors  (Read 971 times)

Offline fhawk618

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Sequencing Processors
« on: July 27, 2010, 07:49:23 AM »
Question for all audiophiliacs! If you were to subject a signal to multiple processors on its way from source to amp, what order would you put these in??? Source Equalization, BBE 362NR Sonic Maximizer, Alesis 3630 Compressor/Limiter/Gate, Active Crossover Network.

Been using this stuff for years and have my own theories that seem to work pretty well, just looking to pick some functional brains, rather than rely on my own (questionably functional?).
"When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro."--Hunter S. Thompson

Offline bmwr75

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Re: Sequencing Processors
« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2010, 08:35:36 PM »
Audiophiles tend to believe the fewer components in the signal path......the better.  Truthfully, In don't even know what three of the four components you listed do or why they are needed in a 2 channel listening system.  Not a value judgement, just showing my limited knowledge.
Media: CDs ripped to Apple Lossless files
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Offline Slim-Shaddy

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Re: Sequencing Processors
« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2010, 09:23:16 PM »
I think you have them in the right configuration, but I am just curious what the need for a compressor is in a home stereo application. I've used them in PA systems to increase the attack of drums and guitars and to limit feedback, just not sure how one would apply in a home stereo.
I am confident that an SL-1200 is capable of outperforming turntables of much higher expense with minor modification.

Offline fhawk618

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Re: Sequencing Processors
« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2010, 07:17:28 AM »
I fully agree with both of the last two comments--1) why would you need this in a home system?, and--2) the fewer the components in the signal path, the better. In my welcome post, I mentioned that I have a history with both true audiophile equipment (what you put in is to be reproduced as accurately as possible within the limitations of the room and/or equipment to fully appreciate the original recording), as well as commercial audio for DJs, bands, nightclubs, etc. (what you put in is to be processesed to death to provide bone-crushing decibel levels in volumetrically challenged spaces--i.e., large, with clarity--not accuracy). Sometimes the two overlap so I always keep a full commercial rack operable at home--plus it comes in handy for that last-minute booking for a wedding, party, etc. (Sorry, you can't "scratch" on my Linn turntable or use my Infinity RS-1s and Krells at the bar).

As to what they do, a compressor/limiter/gate can be used for numerous functions from basic protection of speakers and amps from signal spikes (my primary application) to complex effects on individual instrument channels (guitar, keyboard, drum--attack, sustain, decay rates, or vocals--presence).

The BBE Sonic Maximizer is to commercial audio what my Carver Sonic Holography Unit is to my audiophile system. By manipulating delays at different points across the frequency spectrum, it insures that all frequencies arrive at the soundstage together for the desired "sonic image".
"When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro."--Hunter S. Thompson